How To Prepare The Garden For A New Hedge

How To Prepare The Garden For A New Hedge

Even particularly high-quality hedge plants are best planted in the ground as soon as possible after delivery. Plants naturally grow best in the soil, where the roots are surrounded by many soil nutrients. If plants do not grow in the soil for an extended period of time, then they can suffer damage as a result, quickly causing failure. In the worst case scenario, the plants will then partially or completely die. Therefore, on the day of delivery of your new hedge plants, you should prepare the garden for a new hedge. This will allow you to start planting immediately after delivery, which will allow your hedge plants to grow again in the garden soil as soon as possible. We will now explain in more detail the main steps in this regard.

Weeds are almost always undesirable, which is why they are called weeds. However, if you are about to plant a new hedge, it is especially important to make sure that there are no weeds in the immediate area around your new hedge.


Remove the weeds around your hedge.


Weeds are almost always unwanted, which is why they are called weeds. However, if you are about to plant a new hedge, then it is especially important that there are no weeds in the immediate area surrounding your new hedge. Of course, if you are going to use young plants that will later grow into a handsome, full-bush hedge, then it is desirable that when you water the plants, only the roots of your hedge plants benefit from that watering and not the weeds. Therefore, by removing the weeds from the new location of the hedge, the hedge plants will immediately get a much better start.

On delivery day, it is better to do the weed removal before the plants are delivered. If you do this just before, then the chance is small that new weeds can form again in between. The immediate area around the hedge should therefore be made weed-free for at least half a meter on all sides. Also, after planting, make sure that the area remains weed-free for at least a full year. This will allow your young plants to absorb the nutrients in the soil much better and thus benefit optimally from the nutrients.

The first part of planting should consist of digging a planting trench or several planting holes, in which the hedge plants will be planted afterwards.


Dig a planting trench or planting holes.


The first part of planting should consist of digging a planting trench or several planting holes into which the hedge plants will be planted thereafter. This can be done quite beautifully even before the plants are delivered. Depending on how long the hedge is to be, it may take some time before the planting trough or holes are ready for use. Therefore, so that the plants have to wait out of the ground only a short time, you can do this step before delivery. A planting trench should be a minimum of 50 cm deep and 35 cm wide along the entire length of the hedge, so that the root balls of the hedge plants fit completely into the trench.

It will have a positive effect on your new hedge plants if you loosen the soil before planting. This is because it makes it much easier for the roots to grow through the loosened soil. This step can be done quite easily. Once the planting trough is ready for use, all you need to do is pour some loosened soil into the trough. However, you can also dig the planting trough a little deeper. The loosened portion that was dug too deep can then be poured back into the planting trough, even before the plants are planted in the planting trough.

For this step, keep a close eye on the weather. This is because it should be avoided, if possible, that the planting trough fills with rainwater even before the plants are planted in the trough. Therefore, in case of heavy rain, it is better to dig individual planting holes, into which your new hedge plants can be planted piece by piece immediately after delivery.

Some hedge plants are particularly sensitive when it comes to moist soil. In fact, with prolonged soil wetness hedge plant roots begin to rot.


Make the soil more permeable


Some hedge plants are particularly sensitive when it comes to moist soil. If the soil remains wet for a long time, the roots of hedge plants start to rot. Conifers in particular are very susceptible when it comes to soil wetness, while they are of course perfectly suited as a pretty, tightly trimmed garden hedge. Therefore, we strongly recommend you to make the soil more permeable even before planting your new hedge in the garden. If you have heavy, very compact clay soil, a drainage pipe or other drainage system should be worked into the soil. Is your garden soil not particularly compact? Then it is usually quite sufficient to poke a few deep holes in the soil for excess water to seep through.

The best drainage time for the soil is exactly when you dig the planting trough. Once the trench is deep enough, then you should poke a few holes in the soil about 10 inches apart. Then make sure that these holes are also a minimum of 10 cm deep. You should do this even before you pour the previously excavated soil back into the planting trough, which will also help the permeability of the soil. This significantly reduces the chance that the roots of your hedge plants will have to grow under water for too long. By the way, there are also hedge plants that can handle wet soil very well, think here of the hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) or also the primeval sequoia (Metasequoia glyptostroboides). However, take into account that these two variants are non-evergreen hedge plants.

Of course, these preparations also apply to all other hedge plants, think here of the yew, the cherry laurel or even the beech, to name just a few examples.



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